Hampshire Astronomical Group

Established 1960, Online since 1998

Observatory Accessibility

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Hampshire Astronomical Group welcome you!

The Hampshire Astronomical Group, operates from its Clanfield Observatory on the border of the villages of Horndean and Clanfield, and is reputed to be one of the best equipped amateur observatories in the UK. The observatory is situated on the edge of the beautiful South Downs National Park.

From autumn to spring we run our very popular Open Evenings for the general public. These always book up very quickly so please keep an eye on the website for the release of new events.

We also take private visits from Guides, Scouts, U3A and other interested groups. Details can be found on the 'Schools and Club Visits' page.

Also popular are our astronomy courses which start in September and January. More details on these can be found in this website under ‘Astronomy Courses’ and then choosing ‘Astronomy for Beginners Course’.

Our monthly public lectures are held at Clanfield Memorial Hall. The latest program can be found on our ‘Public Talks page’. All are welcome and admission is £3 for non-members.

Thank you for visiting our website and we hope to see you in person in the not-too-distant future. If you have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact us via the ‘Contact Information’ page.

Steve Bosley
Chairman:  Hampshire Astronomical Group

 

What's on in the next month...

There are no events scheduled.

Astronomical Events for July 2024


Moon

 

New Moon
5th July

 

First Quarter
12th July

 

Full Moon
21st July

 

Third Quarter
28th July

 

3 July – morning – The crescent Moon will be 4.6° northwest of Jupiter.

5 July – 04:20 BST – The thin Moon can be seen about 5° above the north-east horizon.  Jupiter and Aldebaran will be to the right of the Moon.

6 July – 21:48 BST – The thin crescent Moon will be about 4° above the north-west horizon.  M44 and Mercury will be to the left of the Moon, and Venus will be starting to rise.

24 July – 23:00 BST – The Moon will be 1.3° east of Saturn.

31 July – morning – The crescent Moon will be 5.3° from Jupiter.

Clair-obscur Effects

13 July – 14:10 BST – The Lunar X and Y will be visible.

14 July – 19:40 BST – Eyes of Clavius will be visible.

Planets

1 July – 01:55 BST – Mars rises, the 25%-lit Moon will be 7° west of the planet.

2 July – morning – When Mars rises this morning, there will be a 17%-lit Moon 6° northeast of the planet.

4 July – Jupiter will be 5° north of Aldebaran.

6 July – Venus will be 3.3° northeast of a less than 1%-lit Moon.

6 July – Ceres (mag. +7.3) will be at opposition and can be found in Sagittarius’s Teapot.  Use binoculars to try and locate the planet.

7 July – evening – Mercury will be 2.2° south of a 3%-lit Moon.

15 July – morning – Mars and Uranus appear in conjunction where they will be separated by 39 arcminutes.  The planets will be 6° south-southwest of the Pleiades.

21 July – early morning – Mars will be 4.8° south of the Pleiades star cluster.

Jupiter Moon Transits

17 July – 02:06-02:31 BST – The shadows of Io and Europa cross Jupiter.

31 July – Jupiter, Mars, and Aldebaran form a triangle in Taurus.

Meteor Showers

30 July – Peak of the Alpha Capricornid meteor shower with a ZHR of 5.

30 July – Peak of the Delta Aquariid meteor shower with a ZHR of 16.

Binocular Objects

The Scutum Star Cloud – a rich star cloud that contains M11 (the Wild Duck Cluster).

M22 – this is the largest globular cluster that can be seen from the UK.  To find the cluster locate the top of the ‘lid’ (Kaus Borealis (Lambda (λ) Sagittarii) of the Teapot asterism in Sagittarius, move the star to the south-west of your view and M22 should be near the centre.

M6/NGC 6405 (the Butterfly Cluster) – this can be seen 6° west of Alnasl (Gamma22) Sagittarii).  A clear southern horizon is needed in order to see the wings and antennae.

Deep Sky Objects

M8 (Lagoon nebula) – this nebula can be found 6.1°north of Alnasl (Gamma22) Sagittarii).  A 150mm scope will reveal a cluster and bright nebula with a curving, dark lane.  More detail can be seen using a larger aperture telescope.

M20 (the Trifid Nebula) – located 1.5° north and slightly west of M8.  You can see the southern emission lobe using a 150mm telescope.

M21 – a small cluster with a bright central core.  This cluster is located 41 arcminutes northeast of the two stars at the centre of the brightest part of M20.  A 150mm scope will reveal over 20 stars, and a 250mm scope will show about 50 stars.

M23 – a bright, large open star cluster in Sagittarius.  To locate it find Mu (μ) Sagittarii and the cluster lies just to the northwest of the multiple star system.  A 150mm scope will show about 80 stars, but a 250mm scope will reveal over 100 stars.

M102/NGC 5866 (the Spindle Galaxy) – a lenticular galaxy which can be found 4° southwest of mag. 3.3 red giant star Iota Draconis.  A small telescope will show a thin, nebulous patch under good conditions.  A 4” telescope will show a bright elliptical nebulous patch with a brighter core, while larger telescopes will reveal a halo of light and hints of the galaxy’s dark dust lane.

Miscellaneous

All month – Start looking out for noctilucent clouds.  These clouds shine with an electric-blue tint and can be seen low above the northwest horizon 90-120 minutes after sunset, or in the northeast horizon 90-120 minutes before sunrise.  They only appear 4-6 weeks either side of the solstice.

5 July – Earth reaches aphelion, and will be at its furthest away from the Sun.

Moon Image Credit: Steve Broadbent 
Jupiter Image Credit: NASA
Noctilucent Clouds Image Credit: Steve Knight

What's on between next month and 6 months...

Friday,
13th September
2024
The Astronomy of Stonehenge
A talk by Simon Banton
Clanfield Memorial Hall - start time 8:00pm

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Saturday,
14th September
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Moon & Saturn
- start time 7:30pm

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Sunday,
15th September
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Moon & Saturn
- start time 7:30pm

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Saturday,
12th October
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Moon, Saturn & Jupiter
- start time 7:15pm

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Sunday,
13th October
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Moon, Saturn & Jupiter
- start time 7:15pm

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Saturday,
9th November
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Saturn, Jupiter & Moon
- start time 7:15pm

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Sunday,
10th November
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Saturn, Jupiter & Moon
- start time 7:15pm

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Saturday,
7th December
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Moon, Saturn & Jupiter
- start time 7:15pm

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Sunday,
8th December
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Moon, Saturn & Jupiter
- start time 7:15pm

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What's on after the next 6 months...

Friday,
14th March
2025
When a Pro Photographer does Astrophotography
A talk by Paul Colley CB OBE FRPS
Clanfield Memorial Hall - start time 8:00pm

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