Hampshire Astronomical Group

Established 1960, Online since 1998

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Hampshire Astronomical Group welcome you!

The Hampshire Astronomical Group, operates from its Clanfield Observatory on the border of the villages of Horndean and Clanfield, and is reputed to be one of the best equipped amateur observatories in the UK. The observatory is situated on the edge of the beautiful South Downs National Park.

From autumn to spring we run our very popular Open Evenings for the general public. These always book up very quickly so please keep an eye on the website for the release of new events.

We also take private visits from Guides, Scouts, U3A and other interested groups. Details can be found on the 'Schools and Club Visits' page.

Also popular are our astronomy courses which start in September and January. More details on these can be found in this website under ‘Astronomy Courses’ and then choosing ‘Astronomy for Beginners Course’.

Our monthly public lectures are held at Clanfield Memorial Hall. The latest program can be found on our ‘Public Talks page’. All are welcome and admission is £3 for non-members.

Thank you for visiting our website and we hope to see you in person in the not-too-distant future. If you have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact us via the ‘Contact Information’ page.

Steve Bosley
Chairman:  Hampshire Astronomical Group

 

What's on in the next month...

Friday,
14th June
2024
Eclipse and Revelation
A talk by Mike Frost FRAS
Clanfield Memorial Hall - start time 8:00pm

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Saturday,
22nd June
2024
Public Sun Live
Clanfield Observatory - start time 1:00pm

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Saturday,
6th July
2024
Public Sun Live
Clanfield Observatory - start time 1:00pm

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Friday,
12th July
2024
Astronomy in the Ancient World
A talk by Dr Mike Leggett
Clanfield Memorial Hall - start time 8:00pm

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Sun Live at the Clanfield Observatory

Sun Live Event - See the Sun in all its Explosive Glory !

Clanfield Observatory offer a rare chance to see the Sun's surface in real time using special Sun Filters.
Depending on the weather conditions and the activity on the Sun this is a chance to see Prominences and Sun Spots using Hydrogen Alpha and other special Filters.
Should the weather prevent views of the Sun we will give a tour of the observatory and an illustrated talk about the Sun.

Please Note: Entrance is exclusively by pre purchased tickets priced at Adults - £10 each for 16 and under £6 each. (Minimum age 8 years old).

The dates for these events is Saturday 22nd  June & Saturday 6th July 2024. Arrive time 12.45pm for a 1pm start. The event will finish around 3pm
 
For tickets please purchase them using Ticket Tailor on the Sun Live page of the website. 

Sun Live Booking Click Here

Images credit: Phil Reed

Astronomical Events for June 2024

 

 Moon

 

New Moon
6th June

 

First Quarter
14th June

 

Full Moon
22 June

 

Third Quarter
28th Junel

1 June – 02:54 BST – The Moon will be 0° south of Neptune.

3 June – 03:30 BST – The crescent Moon will be 3.3° northeast of Mars.  Look for them low in the east.

7 June – just after sunset – A 2%-lit Moon can be seen low above the northwest horizon.

8 June – Lunar libration makes this a good opportunity to view the crater Humboldt.  If this evening is clouded out, try again tomorrow evening (9 June).

8 June – 22:30 – The crescent Moon will be south of Castor and Pollux.

16 June – 19:00 BST – Spica will be 25 arcminutes south-southwest of the Moon.

22 June – A good time to view the crater Einstein and Mare Orientale.

27 and 28 June – morning – The Moon will close to Saturn.

Clair-obscur Effects

14 June – 17:00 BST – Locate the crater Aristillus, you may be able to see a small set of lights known as the Stars of Aristillus.

29 June – 02:00 BST – the Cutlass will be visible.

29 June – 07:00 BST – Curtiss’s Cross is visible.

29 June 11:00 BST – the Star-Tip Mountain will be visible.

16 June – late-afternoon – the Jewelled Handle can be seen; this effect is formed by the illuminated arc of Montes Jura.

Planets

4 June – morning – Jupiter and Mercury will appear 31 arcminutes apart, the closest approach being at 11:20 BST when 7 arcminutes will separate them, both planets will be 12° from the Sun at this time.

5 June – 01:00 – Uranus will be 4° south of the Moon.

30 June – Ceres can be seen in Sagittarius where it will be southeast of the ‘handle’ of the Teapot asterism.

Occultations

24 May – morning – the Moon will occult M4, a globular cluster.  A little later the Moon will appear 33 arcminutes south of Antares.

Comets

11 June – Comet C/2023 A3 Tsuchinshan-ATLAS can be seen 2.2° west-northwest of Zavijava (Beta (β) Virginis, at mag. +9.0 it may be tricky to see.  In the south of England at 23:30 BST, Ceres will be 30° high in the south-west.

Binocular Objects

M81 (Bode’s Galaxy)/M82 (the Cigar Galaxy) – to find these objects, locate 24 Ursae Majoris and the galaxies should be in the same field of view.

Kappa Dra group – this is a line of stars, the brightest being Kappa (κ) Draconis which is a hot blue-white star.  To the north of Kappa Draconis are two orange stars, and to the south is 4 Draconis, a reddish long-period pulsating variable.

Polaris ‘Engagement’ Ring’ – this is a circle of 8th and 9th magnitude stars which can be located by finding Polaris (Alpha (α) Ursae Minoris).

Deep Sky Objects

M13 – globular cluster located in Hercules, this cluster will be at its highest point in the sky at about 02:00 BST, so a good time to view it.  You can see it using binoculars, and a 3” telescope at 20x power will show it as a mottled ball but increase the power from 20x and you may see some resolved stars at the cluster’s periphery.  The cluster can be found on the western side of the ‘Keystone’ asterism, lying about 2.5° south-southwest of mag. +3.5 eta (η) Herculis.

M19 – a globular cluster located in Ophiuchus.  A 150mm scope will show a view of the cluster covering an area 6 x 5 arcminutes.  A 300mm scope will resolve stars right across its area.

M27 (the Dumbbell nebula) – a planetary nebula located in Vulpecula.  To find it locate Sagitta’s ‘arrow’ asterism; alpha (α), beta (β) and delta (δ) mark the arrow’s tail, with gamma (γ) the tip of the arrow.  From gamma, sweep 3° north to find M27.  M27 (mag. +7.3) can be seen with binoculars, and a 80mm refractor will give good views, a 150mm telescope will show the bright lobes, but to see the central star will require a 250mm telescope and a transparent and steady night.

NGC 6210 (The Turtle Nebula) – this is a mag. +8.8 nebula located in Hercules and requires a medium-aperture telescope.

NGC 6235 – a globular cluster located between 44 Ophiuchi and Psi (Ψ) Ophiuchi.  A 150mm scope will show a loose globular 2 arcminutes across.

NGC 6905 (The Blue Flash Nebula) – this mag. +11.1 nebula can be seen through medium aperture telescopes, although a large telescope will reveal hints of a complex structure.

NGC 6781 – a large planetary nebula located in Aquila and can be seen through a medium-aperture telescope.  The view can be improved using an O-III or UHC filter.

IC 4634 – a double-shelled planetary nebula which can be found 2° east and 0.5°north of NGC 6235.  A 250mm scope and powers over 200x will show a nebula with a north-south elongation.  To see the central star will require a large telescope.

Miscellaneous

All month – Start looking out for noctilucent clouds.  These clouds shine with an electric-blue tint and can be seen low above the northwest horizon 90-120 minutes after sunset, or in the northeast horizon 90-120 minutes before sunrise.  They only appear 4-6 weeks either side of the solstice.

17 June – Earliest sunrise of the year.

20 June – 21:51 BST – Northern Hemisphere’s summer solstice when the Sun reaches its most northerly point.

Moon Image Credit: Steve Broadbent
Jupiter Image Credit: NASA
M13 Image Credit: Steve Broadbent
Noctilucent Clouds Image Credit: David Briggs

What's on between next month and 6 months...

Friday,
13th September
2024
The Astronomy of Stonehenge
A talk by Simon Banton
Clanfield Memorial Hall - start time 8:00pm

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Saturday,
14th September
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Moon & Saturn
- start time 7:30pm

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Sunday,
15th September
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Moon & Saturn
- start time 7:30pm

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Saturday,
12th October
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Moon, Saturn & Jupiter
- start time 7:15pm

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Sunday,
13th October
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Moon, Saturn & Jupiter
- start time 7:15pm

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Saturday,
9th November
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Saturn, Jupiter & Moon
- start time 7:15pm

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Sunday,
10th November
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Saturn, Jupiter & Moon
- start time 7:15pm

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Saturday,
7th December
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Moon, Saturn & Jupiter
- start time 7:15pm

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Sunday,
8th December
2024
Public Open Evening Sold Out!
Moon, Saturn & Jupiter
- start time 7:15pm

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What's on after the next 6 months...

Friday,
14th March
2025
When a Pro Photographer does Astrophotography
A talk by Paul Colley CB OBE FRPS
Clanfield Memorial Hall - start time 8:00pm

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